Take a long hard look at your career. You may be surprised at what you discover.

Frank Hutton

My wife took up photography a few years ago. Our children had left home and were much less dependent on her, and she was looking for an outlet for her creative energies. She’s produced some great shots over the years and many of them adorn our walls at home. However the true value is one we did not anticipate.

She now looks at the world in a different way.

Having concentrated her eyes through a lens to get the perfect shot, she began to notice things through that lens she might previously not have noticed. Some of them large and some of them small and seemingly insignificant: perhaps the angle of two metal stanchions glinting in the sunlight; a pattern created by paving slabs, a tiny insect on a flower, (not just the flower). She has become much more aware of the world around her and finds great joy in it, whether she has a camera in her hands or not.

In my work as a career coach, I have seen a similar phenomenon occur.

When people begin their journey towards a better working life with me, they often expect me to be the key source of revelation and insight. And I may well provide that in respect of techniques to approach employers, how to write a killer CV or how you can organise yourself to ensure you can hold down the current ‘day job’ while finding another direction. However the most powerful revelations come from within themselves, usually after a period of time.

The key part of the Hutton&co process happens right at the start: the Analysis stage. We assist you to take a long hard look at yourself from a work perspective. What kind of things motivate you and which ones demotivate you? Why do you work better with some people than others? Why is the job you’re doing now no longer fulfilling you? Is your current desire to retrain as a sheep farmer stem from a deep-seated aptitude for animal husbandry or is it a response to stress? Everyone we work with is unique so the question combinations and the answers, especially, will be unique to each.

It can be long after this initial work that the insight comes. You learn to be more discerning about your work and who you work with and how. You understand more about yourself and begin to recognise warning signs and start to avoid damaging situations.  You also know what a great opportunity looks like when it pops up. All things perhaps you’d not noticed before.

You now see you, your career and the working world in a different way.

Whoever you choose to assist you on that journey, I encourage you to do it at the earliest available opportunity because the world of work will (eventually) become a more joyful place for you because of it, and maybe so will you as a person. Nice thought?

 

Frank is a Career Coach living in the Bristol & Bath area working with individuals right across the south of England and also overseas.